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Accolades for British Prehistory Project

15 July 16 -- emma.henderson_3627
Arrowheads from British Prehistory

We are delighted to share that Clare Coleman, Education Officer for Early Years to Key Stage 2 at the Ashmolean Museum, and William Mills, Oxford University PhD student and experimental archaeologist, received an honourable mention at this year’s OxTALENT awards ceremony. This was in recognition of the brilliant podcast series, titled Living in the Stone Age, they created as part of their project to develop primary resources relating to British Prehistory. The annual OxTALENT awards celebrate and reward the innovative use of digital technologies to enhance teaching, learning, research and outreach at the University of Oxford and the Living in the Stone Age productions were recognised in the Academic Podcasting category.

Clare and William began the project in 2015 as a response to British Prehistory becoming included in the Primary School Curriculum. Faced with the challenge of producing a new range of educational resources Clare enlisted the help of William and collaborated with colleagues across the University including curator Alison Roberts, the Oxford University Education Media Services, and the Oxford Palaeotech Society. Clare was able to make use of the Ashmolean’s Prehistory collections which spans thousands of years from the Palaeolithic (from as early as c300,000 years ago) to the Iron Age (c750BC – 43AD) and, with Alison’s help, found excellent examples in the museum’s handling collection for use in the project.

Working with local schools during the project’s pilot stage meant the team could make sure the resources they were developing would be useful and engaging for both teachers and students.

Using an Innovation Fund grant from the Oxford University Museums Partnership the project produced 11 short films featuring Experimental Archaeologists, Oxford University Lecturers, and Bushcraft specialists demonstrating a range of Stone Age crafts, skills and technologies as well as art and music. Each 5 minute film was designed to be used in the classroom to focus on a particular technology. 

The project also produced a range of other teaching resources relating to British Prehistory available online including a selection of zoomable images, challenge cards for students and corresponding teachers’ notes. The museum also holds taught gallery sessions in the Prehistory gallery.

You can see all of these resources – including the 11 films – on the Ashmolean’s website: http://www.ashmolean.org/education/resources/resources2011/?rid=29.

 

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